FLUCKEY, Eugene Bennett  
 
PERSONALIA
 
Name:  Fluckey, Eugene Bennett
Date of birth: October 5th, 1913 (Washington D.C./Washington, United States)
Date of death:  June 28th, 2007 (Annapolis/Maryland, United States)
Buried on:  United States Naval Academy Cemetery
Nationality:  American
BIOGRAPHY: 
For his actions as Chief of the United States Military Assistance Advisory Group to the Government of Portugal between July 1968 and July 1972, Eugene Fluckey received the Navy Distinguished Service Medal.
     
MEDAL OF HONOR - NAVY/MARINE CORPS (MOH)
Rank: Commander
Unit: U.S.S. Barb
Awarded on: 1945
Action: Citation:
"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Barb during her 11th war patrol along the east coast of China from 19 December 1944 to 15 February 1945. After sinking a large enemy ammunition ship and damaging additional tonnage during a running two-hour night battle on 8 January, Commander Fluckey, in an exceptional feat of brilliant deduction and bold tracking on 25 January, located a concentration of more than 30 enemy ships in the lower reaches of Nankuan Chiang (Mamkwan Harbor). Fully aware that a safe retirement would necessitate an hour's run at full speed through the uncharted, mined, and rock-obstructed waters, he bravely ordered, "Battle station--torpedoes!" In a daring penetration of the heavy enemy screen, and riding in five fathoms of water, he launched the Barb's last forward torpedoes at 3,000-yard range. Quickly bringing the ship's stern tubes to bear, he turned loose four more torpedoes into the enemy, obtaining eight direct hits on six of the main targets to explode a large ammunition ship and cause inestimable damage by the resultant flying shells and other pyrotechnics. Clearing the treacherous area at high speed, he brought the Barb through to safety and four days later sank a large Japanese freighter to complete a record of heroic combat achievement, reflecting the highest credit upon Commander Fluckey, his gallant officers and men, and the United States Naval Service."
 
     
NAVY CROSS
Rank: Lieutenant Commander
Unit: U.S.S. Barb (SS-220)
Awarded on: September 17th, 1944
Action: Citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Barb (SS-220), on the Eighth War Patrol of that submarine during the period 21 May 1944 to 9 July 1944, in enemy controlled waters of the Pacific War Area. Skillfully maneuvering his vessel into favorable strike position despite the hazards of adverse weather, ice floes and fog, Commander Fluckey launched torpedo attacks to sink five enemy ships totaling more than 37,000 tons and account for two more in aggressive gun battles. Despite persistent hostile countermeasures, he employed skillful evasive tactics to bring his ship to port without damage. His leadership and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Commander Fluckey and the United States Naval Service."
Details: Pacific Fleet Board Awards: Serial 75 (September 17, 1944).
 
     
NAVY CROSS
Rank: Commander
Unit: U.S.S. Barb (SS-220)
Awarded on: January 5th, 1945
Action: Citation:
"for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Barb (SS-220), on the Ninth War Patrol of that submarine during the period 4 August 1944 to 9 October 1944, in enemy controlled waters of the Luzon Straits. Pursuing aggressive and tenacious tactics despite strong countermeasures by the enemy, Commander Fluckey launched damaging torpedo attacks against Japanese shipping and combatant units to sink a 10,000-ton auxiliary aircraft carrier and to damage a tanker of 5,000 tons. Effecting the rescue of fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who were survivors of a torpedoed enemy transport, he provided care and treatment for t he sick and wounded and, although heavy enemy counterattacks caused minor damage to his ship, employed evasive tactics and returned to port without further damage. His skill, courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
Details: Second Navy Cross received as a Golden Star to be worn on the ribbon of the first Navy Cross.
Pacific Fleet Board Awards: Serial 80 (January 5, 1945).
 
     
NAVY CROSS
Rank: Commander
Unit: U.S.S. Barb (SS-220)
Awarded on: 1945
Action: Citation:
"for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Barb (SS-220), on the Tenth War Patrol of that submarine during the period 27 October 1944 to 25 November 1944, in enemy controlled waters of the East China Sea. Maneuvering his ship in extremely shallow water and with skill and aggressiveness, Commander Fluckey braved intense hostile countermeasures to penetrate strong enemy escort screens and launch smashing torpedo attacks against Japanese shipping, sinking five enemy ships for a total of more than 28,000 tons and damaging three other vessels, including a large aircraft carrier, totaling more than 40,000 tons. By his inspiring leadership and devotion to the fulfillment of his hazardous missions, Commander Fluckey upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
Details: Third Nacy Cross received as a second Golden Star to be worn on the ribbon of the first Navy Cross.
Pacific Fleet Board Awards: Serial 75.
 
     
NAVY CROSS
Rank: Commander
Unit: U.S.S. Barb (SS-220)
Awarded on: October 1st, 1945
Action: Citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Barb (SS-220), on the Twelth War Patrol of that submarine during the period 8 June 1945 to 2 August 1945, in enemy controlled waters of the East China Sea. Introducing rocket and saboteur tactics into submarine warfare, Commander Fluckey braved severe enemy countermeasures including six bombing attacks by enemy aircraft, gunfire from enemy shore batteries and surface ships and extensive depth charge attacks to take his vessel into extremely shallow water and launch bold torpedo, rocket and gun attacks which resulted in the sinking of enemy shipping totaling 11,000 tons and the infliction of extreme damage to seven Japanese coastal towns. Landing a party of commandos in rubber boats on a hostile shore on one occasion, he contributed to their success in destroying a Japanese train. By his courage and inspiring leadership throughout, he upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
Details: Fourth Navy Cross received as third Golden Star to be worn on the ribbon of the first Navy Cross.
Commander Submarines Pacific Fleet: Serial 02417 (October 1, 1945).
 
 
 
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Picture source:   - Naval Historical Center
Information source(s):   - Sterner C.D., Recipients of The Navy Cross, 1916 - Present
- Jordan, K. N., Yesterday's Heroes, Schiffer Publishing Ltd., USA 1996
- The Military Times Hall of Valor
   
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